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Thursday

The Opening

 

Today we are going to plan the opening of our story. To do this we need to think about our main character. Where are they going to be at the start of the story and how are they going to be feeling? Usually we want the reader to like our main character. One way to achieve this is by placing them in an unfortunate place. This makes the reader feel sorry for our character and also allows for a bit of action when our character tries to escape!

 

Let’s think about some famous stories and how they begin. Think about the main character and how they feel about their life.

 

  1. Harry Potter – Harry lives in a cupboard under the stairs with a family who are unkind to him.
  2. Star Wars – Luke Skywalker lives with his aunt and uncle on a desert planet. He wants to be a pilot but his family want him to be a farmer.
  3. The Ice Monster – Elsie is an orphan who lives in an awful orphanage. She wants to escape and visit the Natural History Museum.
  4. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Charlie comes from a poor family and dreams of visiting Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. His only chance is to get a golden ticket from a bar of chocolate. I have included chapter one of this story below  as a good example of an opening.It sets up the characters, the location and tell you about what Charlie wants.
  5. Matilda – Matilda is a child genius but her family are not very supportive. They are mean to her and make her feel sad so she plays pranks on them.

 

See if you can think of any of your favourite stories and how they begin. How do they make you like your main character?

 

 

 

Task 1: Bullet point what is going to happen during the opening part of your story. Where is it going to be set and what is going to happen? Think about how you will describe your main character and the people around them. It would be a good idea to read chapter one of 'Charlie and the Chocolate Factory' which I have included below as a good example of an opening.

 

Task 2: Take your bullet points and plan out the start of a story map. A story map is how we plan our stories at school (I have included examples below) - Your child will know how to do this! Draw the start of the story and include any key words that you want to use in your story.

 

Have a think about what will happen next in your story – we will be planning this tomorrow!

 

 

Opening - WAGGOL (What a good one looks like)

 

Chapter 1

Here Comes Charlie

 

 

 

 

 

These two very old people are the father and mother of Mr Bucket. Their names are Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine.

 

 

And these two very old people are the father and mother of Mrs Bucket. Their names are Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina.

 

 

 

 

This is Mr Bucket. This is Mrs Bucket.

Mr and Mrs Bucket have a small boy whose name is Charlie Bucket.

 

 

 

 

This is Charlie.

How d’you do? And how d’you do? And how d’you do again? He is pleased to meet you.

The whole of this family – the six grown-ups (count them) and little Charlie Bucket – live together in a small wooden house on the edge of a great town.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The house wasn’t nearly large enough for so many people, and life was extremely uncomfortable for them all. There were only two rooms in the place altogether, and there was only one bed. The bed was given to the four old grandparents because they were so old and tired. They were so tired, they never got out of it.

Grandpa Joe and Grandma Josephine on this side, Grandpa George and Grandma Georgina on this side.

Mr and Mrs Bucket and little Charlie Bucket slept in the other room, upon mattresses on the floor.

In the summertime, this wasn’t too bad, but in the winter, freezing cold draughts blew across the floor all night long, and it was awful.

There wasn’t any question of them being able to buy a better house – or even one more bed to sleep in. They were far too poor for that.

Mr Bucket was the only person in the family with a job. He worked in a toothpaste factory, where he sat all day long at a bench and screwed the little caps on to the tops of the tubes of toothpaste after the tubes had been filled. But a toothpaste cap-screwer is never paid very much money, and poor Mr Bucket, however hard he worked, and however fast he screwed on the caps, was never able to make enough to buy one half of the things that so large a family needed. There wasn’t even enough money to buy proper food for them all. The only meals they could afford were bread and margarine for breakfast, boiled potatoes and cabbage for lunch, and cabbage soup for supper. Sundays were a bit better. They all looked forward to Sundays because then, although they had exactly the same, everyone was allowed a second helping.

The Buckets, of course, didn’t starve, but every one of them – the two old grandfathers, the two old grandmothers, Charlie’s father, Charlie’s mother, and especially little Charlie himself – went about from morning till night with a horrible empty feeling in their tummies.

Charlie felt it worst of all. And although his father and mother often went without their own share of lunch or supper so that they could give it to him, it still wasn’t nearly enough for a growing boy. He desperately wanted something more filling and satisfying than cabbage and cabbage soup. The one thing he longed for more than anything else was . . . CHOCOLATE.

Walking to school in the mornings, Charlie could see great slabs of chocolate piled up high in the shop windows, and he would stop and stare and press his nose against the glass, his mouth watering like mad. Many times a day, he would see other children taking bars of creamy chocolate out of their pockets and munching them greedily, and that, of course, was pure torture.

Only once a year, on his birthday, did Charlie Bucket ever get to taste a bit of chocolate. The whole family saved up their money for that special occasion, and when the great day arrived, Charlie was always presented with one small chocolate bar to eat all by himself. And each time he received it, on those marvellous birthday mornings, he would place it carefully in a small wooden box that he owned, and treasure it as though it were a bar of solid gold; and for the next few days, he would allow himself only to look at it, but never to touch it. Then at last, when he could stand it no longer, he would peel back a tiny bit of the paper wrapping at one corner to expose a tiny bit of chocolate, and then he would take a tiny nibble – just enough to allow the lovely sweet taste to spread out slowly over his tongue. The next day, he would take another tiny nibble, and so on, and so on. And in this way, Charlie would make his sixpenny bar of birthday chocolate last him for more than a month.

But I haven’t yet told you about the one awful thing that tortured little Charlie, the lover of chocolate, more than anything else. This thing, for him, was far, far worse than seeing slabs of chocolate in the shop windows or watching other children munching bars of creamy chocolate right in front of him. It was the most terrible torturing thing you could imagine, and it was this:

In the town itself, actually within sight of the house in which Charlie lived, there was an ENORMOUS CHOCOLATE FACTORY!

Just imagine that!

And it wasn’t simply an ordinary enormous chocolate factory, either. It was the largest and most famous in the whole world! It was WONKA’S FACTORY, owned by a man called Mr Willy Wonka, the greatest inventor and maker of chocolates that there has ever been. And what a tremendous, marvellous place it was! It had huge iron gates leading into it, and a high wall surrounding it, and smoke belching from its chimneys, and strange whizzing sounds coming from deep inside it. And outside the walls, for half a mile around in every direction, the air was scented with the heavy rich smell of melting chocolate!

Twice a day, on his way to and from school, little Charlie Bucket had to walk right past the gates of the factory. And every time he went by, he would begin to walk very, very slowly, and he would hold his nose high in the air and take long deep sniffs of the gorgeous chocolatey smell all around him.

Oh, how he loved that smell!

And oh, how he wished he could go inside the factory and see what it was like!

 

Story Maps

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